Airbus uses cognitive computing to prevent plane crashes – Software – iTnews

The subtitle of this article – safety, rather than pilot-less jets, the priority – tells the tale. Whether it’s in a call center, an advisor coming to your home, or a commercial airline pilot, cognitive computing is a technology that can make people better at what they do rather than replacing people altogether.

Making people better at what they do takes a couple of forms:

One form: one of the best ways to learn is by looking over an expert’s shoulder while they do something. Interacting with a well-trained cognitive system is similar; while the expert cognitive solution is providing the … well … expertise, the human is watching and learning. Q&A cognitive systems, such as this example from a call center in South Africa, fit this pattern.

Another form is when the cognitive system does the sort of work that a trusted assistant might do, giving the human more time to focus on the important things. The article describes how Airbus is using cognitive computing in this sort of role. Other examples include insurance companies who use cognitive assistants to read and summarize medical reports for the claims assessors that they support.

Still another form is the trusted colleague, where the cognitive system provides a second opinion or acts as a sounding board. IBM with its Watson Health products fit this pattern.

Source: Airbus uses cognitive computing to prevent plane crashes – Software – iTnews